April 29, 2014

Kefir

Kefir (kuh-feer) /noun/
a sour-tasting drink make from milk fermented with certain bacteria.

ORIGIN: Russian

Well, I have a friend who is Russian and she pronounces it key-feer...with one giant roll of the r at the end.  Someday I'll say it right. We're debating whether to buy the real, live grains, but they require daily babysitting and we're not sure if we're up for it.  In the meantime, a local market started carrying the freeze dried starter packages, which does the trick for now.  

Hmmm, good!  This was my first batch, and I've since found that it's even better with a little mango and pineapple mixed in.  =)

9 comments:

  1. I'm impressed that you made your own! Wow! I take the easy way and purchase at the store. Delicious in my morning fruit smoothies. :) Lori

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  2. I'm about to try kefir for the first time. I hope to be able to drink the milk based although I have trouble with lactose. I see there are water based products too, which I can switch to if necessary.

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    1. I've read about the water variety and also saw that some "milk" versions can be done successfully with coconut milk.

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  3. Never heard of this before, I am wondering if its like pasteurized milk in the taste? I used to love that as a child, a really thick milk with a rich flavour. I might look out for kefir and try it :)

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    1. Plain, unsweetened kefir tastes somewhere between yogurt and sour cream. Interesting. I'm not sure I enjoy drinking it straight...but mixed with fruit or made into smoothies is the real deal!!

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  4. I have three comments: 1) Making kefir requires very little work. Very little. It took longer to type this than I spend each week making kefir (been doing it for two years). I make a gallon a week, as several of us drink it, and I also give it to my two elderly Border Collies (on the recommendation of my vet). They love it and thrive on it. The grains take no babysitting--only a fresh infusion of milk every two days or so (that takes 10 seconds). 2) the lactose is consumed by the kefir grains in the process of fermentation. My seriously lactose-intolerant husband drank homemade kefir for two years and never had a problem with it. 3) It is extremely low cost to make your own. Once you purchase the grains (about $10 or so, and they replicate endlessly), you will pay only for the cost of the milk. Compare that to the cost of commercial kefir, which is VERY expensive and not nearly as healthful as making your own fresh kefir. Hope this information helps you!

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    1. Seriously??? Anonymous, please email me at chickensandfinechina@gmail.com if you don't mind. I'd love to ask you a few questions. Everything online says you have to grow batches every day or it all goes south!

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    2. Nancy, my name is Mary Huber, and I'll email you later in the day; right now I have contractors working in the house (yep, they start VERY early!) and the electricity is turned on and off sporadically throughout the day. I won't forget. Right now I have a quart-size mason jar (any glass jar will do) of 2 tablespoons of kefir grains in a quart of milk that's been sitting on my kitchen counter for three days. I need to strain out the grains later and the dogs and I will drink half of the kefir and refrigerate the rest for tomorrow. Admittedly, the kefir will be quite tart (!), but it will be perfectly fine, and the grains will be rarin' to go in another quart of milk.
      "Talk" to you later. ~~ Mary

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  5. That's funny, my roommate is Russian and she just said "kefir" yesterday! :)

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